Monthly Archives: October 2015

Andrew Schoultz Acquired by Crocker Art Museum (CA)

The gallery is thrilled to announce that a major work by Andrew Schoultz “Floating in the Green” (2015), has been acquired by the Crocker Art Museum (CA). The piece is part of Schoultz’s solo exhibition at Mark Moore Gallery, Cyclical Nature, on view through Saturday.

The first public art museum founded in the Western United States, the Crocker Art Museum was established in 1885 and is now one of the leading art museums in California. The Crocker serves as the primary regional resource for the study and appreciation of fine art. The Museum offers a diverse spectrum of special exhibitions and programs to complement its collections of Californian art, works on paper, European art, international ceramics, photography, Asian art, and African and Oceanic art. The Crocker Art Museum is the only museum in the Sacramento region accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), a recognition given to less than 800 of the nation’s 17,500 museums. AAM accreditation certifies that a museum operates according to standards set forth by the museum profession, manages its collections responsibly, and provides quality service to the public.

Sourcing inspiration from 15th Century German map making and Indian miniature paintings, Andrew Schoultz’s frenetic imagery depicts an ephemeral history bound to repeat itself. In his mixed-media works, notions of war, spirituality and sociopolitical imperialism are reoccurring themes, which shrewdly parallel an equally repetitive contemporary pursuit of accumulation and power. Intricate line work, painting, metal leaf and collage twist and undulate under Schoultz’s meticulous hand, ranging from intimately sized wall works to staggering murals and installations. While his illustrated world seems one of chaos and frenzy, Schoultz also implies a sense of alluring fantasy and whimsy – a crossroads vaguely familiar to the modern world.

Schoultz (b. 1975, WI) received his BFA from the Academy of Art University, San Francisco (CA). He has had solo exhibitions in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, Philadelphia, Rotterdam, Boston, London, Portland, Detroit and Milan. He has been included in group exhibitions at the Andy Warhol Museum (PA), Torrance Art Museum (CA), Havana Biennial (Cuba), Hyde Park Arts Center (IL), Laguna Art Museum (CA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (CA), among others. His work can be seen in the public collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (CA), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (CA), Frederick R. Weisman Foundation (CA) and the Progressive Art Collection (OH), in addition to his publicly funded murals in Portland (ME), Jogjakarta (Indonesia) and San Francisco (CA). Schoultz lives and works in Los Angeles (CA).

floatinginthegreen2015_edited_14

Floating in the Green

Penelope Umbrico at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum (LA)

Gallery artist Penelope Umbrico is part of Sun Light / Star Light, a group show at Louisiana Art & Science (LA). Presented in honor of the International Year of Light, Sun Light / Star Light provides a telling glimpse into the ways in which we think about the Sun in terms of its aesthetic, scientific and spiritual dimensions.

Nearly every human civilization has expressed fascination with celestial phenomena, and the Sun in particular. Thought to be about 4.5 billion years old, our Sun is considered relatively young. When viewed from Earth, it appears to be roughly the same size as our planet. Yet it is the most massive object in our solar system. It holds 99.8 percent of our solar system’s mass and is roughly 109 times the diameter of Earth. No wonder we have such boundless curiosity about the Sun, and have expressed our understanding of it in a visual manner since prehistoric times.

The exhibition, which brings together a selection of international artists at the forefront of today’s art scene, features imaginative light sculptures, paintings, and digital works made by: artist duo Caitlind R.C. Brown and Wayne Garrett, Calgary, Canada; Jonathan Feldschuh, New York City; IstadPacini Art Lab (collaborators Christine Istad and Lisa Pacini), Oslo, Norway; Eva Lee, Ridgefield, Connecticut; Taro Shinoda, Tokyo, Japan; and Penelope Umbrico, New York. Also on view is an innovative art video produced by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, presented at the Art & Science Museum as an immersive experience. Brought together, these thought-provoking works of art invite us to contemplate upon the Sun and renew our human relationship with the star we live with.

The exhibition runs October 10, 2015 – January 03, 2016.

Click here for more information on Sun Light / Star Light. 

For more information about the artist or available work, please email info@markmooregallery.com.

umbrico_sunsetportraitfromflickr6x9_300dpi_sRGB_800_500_90_c1_c_c

Andrew Schoultz Mural at Mark Moore Gallery

Andrew Schoultz has completed a new mural on the side of the gallery. We are thrilled with the results:

MMG_MURAL-2015_edited

Schoultz’s show, Cyclical Nature runs at the gallery through October 31st.
For more information about the artist or available work, please email info@markmooregallery.com

Andrew Schoultz Acquired by Museum of Art and History (CA)

The gallery is pleased to announce the Museum of Art and History‘s recent acquisition of Andrew Schoultz‘s major work, “Cyclical Nature” (2015).

Lancaster Museum of Art and History (MOAH) houses a collection of post-war period and contemporary art in the areas of painting, sculpture, prints, drawings, photography, film, installations and new media. The museum also houses a collection of art pertaining to the Antelope Valley region. This art was created by artists that lived in, worked in or were inspired to create by the region. Rotating art exhibitions focus on contemporary artists, as well as the art housed within the current collection. In addition, the museum has a vast collection of Native American, historic artifacts and geologic specimens pertaining primarily to the Antelope Valley and its surrounding areas. Many of these items will be on permanent display within the museum, while others make up some of the history themed rotating exhibits showcased throughout the year.

Sourcing inspiration from 15th Century German map making and Indian miniature paintings, Andrew Schoultz’s frenetic imagery depicts an ephemeral history bound to repeat itself. In his mixed-media works, notions of war, spirituality and sociopolitical imperialism are reoccurring themes, which shrewdly parallel an equally repetitive contemporary pursuit of accumulation and power. Intricate line work, painting, metal leaf and collage twist and undulate under Schoultz’s meticulous hand, ranging from intimately sized wall works to staggering murals and installations. While his illustrated world seems one of chaos and frenzy, Schoultz also implies a sense of alluring fantasy and whimsy – a crossroads vaguely familiar to the modern world.

Schoultz (b. 1975, WI) received his BFA from the Academy of Art University, San Francisco (CA). He has had solo exhibitions in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, Philadelphia, Rotterdam, Boston, London, Portland, Detroit and Milan. He has been included in group exhibitions at the Andy Warhol Museum (PA), Torrance Art Museum (CA), Havana Biennial (Cuba), Hyde Park Arts Center (IL), Laguna Art Museum (CA), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (CA), among others. His work can be seen in the public collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (CA), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (CA), Frederick R. Weisman Foundation (CA) and the Progressive Art Collection (OH), in addition to his publicly funded murals in Portland (ME), Jogjakarta (Indonesia) and San Francisco (CA). Schoultz lives and works in Los Angeles (CA).

Cyclical Nature, 2015 / mixed media on canvas / 114 x 95.25 in

Cyclical Nature, 2015 / mixed media on canvas / 114 x 95.25 in

MMG Presents: ART CULVER CITY, LOS ANGELES

Vernissage for Visitors of Average Importance: November 5, 6-8:30pm
Public Hours: 11am-6pm, November 5 – December 19, 2015

Featuring: John Bauer, The Clayton Brothers, Ken Craft, Joshua Dildine, Vernon Fisher, Julie Heffernan, Kiel Johnson, David Klamen, David Maisel, Lester Monzon, Julie Oppermann, Eric Orr, Zemer Peled, Richard Prince, Bob Roberts, Kim Rugg, Christopher Russell, David Ryan, Andrew Schoultz, Allison Schulnik, Meghan Smythe, Robert Therrien, Penelope Umbrico, Ryan Wallace, Stephanie Washburn, Ben Weiner, and Kenichi Yokono.

Mark Moore Gallery proudly presents the inaugural Art Culver City, Los Angeles, an independent counterpoint to Art Basel Miami Beach’s thirteenth annual fair in South Beach, Miami. While the glitterati infiltrate the booths of 267 international galleries at the Miami Beach Convention Center – not to mention the nearly twenty-four satellite fairs occurring the same week – Mark Moore Gallery welcomes art patrons to participate in its own variation of an art fair that offers a unique and exclusive focus:

Art.

In the past decade, art fairs have grown from intimate summits for industry peers into sensationalist bedlam. In 2014 alone, more than 90,000 people visited the main fair. Harper’s Bazaar ran a feature highlighting just 82 “select” parties that would take place during the week, and toy manufacturer Mattel had their signature Barbie doll “Instagram” her experiences from the fairs. VanDutch sponsored logo-emblazoned yachts to shuttle partygoers across Biscayne Bay to the private estate of Russian collector, Maria Baibakova (an event that was covered by Vogue). Without devolving into the antics of Miley Cyrus, Kimye, and Jeff Koons that week – the belief that this affair had anything to do with art seemed farcical. When asked about the “traffic-clogged backdrop” of the city during ABMB Week, Collector Beth Rudin DeWoody told the New York Times “There are some people who come just for the parties, and the hell with the art.” Every fair’s press release reported “record sales and attendance” (as they do every year), but several reports indicated losses for most participating galleries, which contributed to the closures of dozens of midsize galleries and an overall industry loss of 30% in revenues. Many industry experts are starting to question the fair model (in which participating costs can run $35,000-$80,000 for a single event), including the controversial Magnus Resch. His survey of 8,000 gallerists was published in his 2015 “Management of Art Galleries” book, from which data was paraphrased by Bloomberg Business: “It turns out that the upbeat world of biennials and art fairs and parties is in fact a cutthroat, antiquated, deeply flawed industry hampered by an obsession with keeping up appearances and an often misguided aversion to making money.”

More importantly, the subject at the core of the debate appears to suffer the most: the art. A jury of six selection committee members has increasingly dictated the art market for nearly a decade, and many artists feel immense pressure to produce “art fair art” in order to be considered for a coveted spot in the booth. Yet, what can be digested and truly appreciated in a matter of several minutes in between a collector’s aggressive “fair schedule” does not often lend itself to a thoughtful experience. Says critic Jerry Saltz, “When money and hype recede from the art world, one thing I won’t miss will be what curator Francesco Bonami calls the ‘Eventocracy.’ All this flashy ‘art-fair art’ and those highly produced space-eating spectacles and installations wow you for a minute until you move on to the next adrenaline event.”

Mark Moore Gallery invites you do to the opposite. Come and stay for awhile; if nothing else, for the art.

website_background

Mark Moore Gallery in Public Art Review

The gallery has been highlighted in a new posting by the Forecast Editor in Public Art Review titled, Elevating Artists: Why one gallery owner has a formal public art program.” The article focuses on Mark Moore’s long history of making public art an integral part of gallery programming.

The article begins:

“The distinction between “gallery art” and public art usually goes more or less unquestioned, but one veteran gallery owner is blurring the line between the two by running an active public art program out of his art space in Culver City, California.

Mark Moore moved his Mark Moore Gallery to the western Los Angeles community in 2011, after 17 years in Santa Monica and, before that, 10 years running the Works Gallery in Long Beach. “I got involved with artists doing work with light and space back then,” he says, “and I learned that public art was a tricky thing. My artists lost money on it.”

The experience suggested to him that he could help public artists get a better deal while at the same time promoting work that promotes his gallery. In Culver City, he helps any of the artists he represents who express an interest in doing public work.”

Click here to read the article in its entirety.

YORAM WOLBERGER, CA Mission, 2011 / Reinforced Fiberglass, Steel, Urethane Paint, H18 ft x L 14ft x 6 in "Millennium Tower"" Public Art Commission (San Francisco, CA)

YORAM WOLBERGER, CA Mission, 2011 / Reinforced Fiberglass, Steel, Urethane Paint, H18 ft x L 14ft x 6 in
“Millennium Tower”” Public Art Commission (San Francisco, CA)

Andrew Schoultz Interviewed in The Hundreds

Gallery artist Andrew Schoultz has a new interview out in The Hundreds about his current show, Cyclical Nature. In the interview Schoultz discusses his evolving process, his recurring themes, and his plans for the future. When asked for his best piece of advice, this is what he had to say:

“I do not really know 100% for sure what my best piece of advice would be. As an artist, I would definitely say stay true to your own voice and vision and follow through with it. Sometimes you will not know if something works until you complete it, and many times you learn a lot more from failure than you do from success. As a human, I would say to remember to slow down and enjoy the moment you are in and the people you are around. You never know, they could be gone tomorrow. As an artist living to some degree in this thing called the “Art World,” it is very easy to get caught up in all the social ladder-climbing games and “cool guy” shit. It can be very distracting and depressing if you let it. It can consume you and you can really lose perspective on what is really important in life. I have had tastes of this in the past and then realized later how far my head was up my ass. I would also say it is always good to stay humble in all of this. As an artist whose goal is longevity in this, you quickly realize the ebbs and flows of a long-lasting career. There have been extreme highs and lows, and it is good for the soul to accept that and realize that anything that comes fast also leaves fast. Patience is a virtue.”

Click here to read the whole interview.

For more information about the artist or available work, please email info@markmooregallery.com.

IMG_6786_edited-1