Previewed: Stephanie Washburn “Reception” – An Exclusive ARTSY Online Exhibition

Mark Moore Fine Art presents “Reception”, an exclusive online ARTSY exhibition from July 03, 2017 – August 06, 2017 by interdisciplinary artist Stephanie Washburn, including photographs, collages and drawings. Washburn continues her exploration of the interface of material and digital surfaces as well as the persistent relevance of human touch in the construction of pictorial space.

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The “Reception” series of digital photographs, was composed by staging everyday materials against screen imagery from film, advertising, surveillance footage and the Internet. Washburn works from a screen placed on the floor like the flatbed plane of an abstract canvas and subtly, but also almost violently, alters the implications of the source imagery. The backgrounds, often eerily empty landscapes, are used to set the scene in their original context. However, Washburn diverts those narratives to her own outcomes through the use of materials such as hair, wool, bubble wrap, bottle mouths and burning embers. The resulting photographs subvert the disembodied experience of watching a screen, and ultimately return us to its surface as an unlikely point of contact and physical orientation. Teasing out tensions between constructed and straight photography, the images are clearly theatrical but also present evidence of the ambiguity of place and presence in an increasingly virtual world. Washburn also debuts a related series of collages and assemblages, “Here About.”

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The work began in response to a group of found vintage silver gelatin prints. Washburn’s cuts, piercings and sculptural additions layer the prints with a myriad of histories beyond their own and question the authority of the photograph to capture a particular moment. “Reception” – as with the later series “Telltale” – utilized orphaned materials, ranging from fur to tennis balls, are aggressively detached from their original function and replaced by an animate, almost totemic, and at times uncanny presence. Washburn concludes with two drawings on vellum paper from her series “Walking Back the Cat,” which again refer to screen imagery in a decidedly performative way. Reiterating the importance of touch, the drawings show her hand’s attempt to make sense of the spiraling catastrophe depicted in several looped sequences from the film Earthquake about the end of Los Angeles. The results, delicate but dogged, wrest an apocalyptic spectacle onto an intimate surface layered with the slower time of a real body in action.

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Washburn received her MFA from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her work has been exhibited at The University Art Museum (CA), The Palms Bar (CA), Atkinson Gallery (CA), Santa Barbara Museum of Art (CA), Eagle Rock Center for the Arts (CA), Los Angeles Municipal Gallery (CA) and Davidson Art Center (CT). Washburn’s photographs have been acquired by the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego (CA) and Sweeney Art Gallery at the University of California, Riverside (CA). She currently lives and works between Ojai and Los Angeles.

You can preview this presentation now at the following link:

https://www.artsy.net/show/mark-moore-fine-art-stephanie-washburn-reception

#markmoorefineart #stephaniewashburn

 

 

 

Jeffry Mitchell “The Salt-Fired Works 2017” Exclusive ARTSY Online Exhibition Opens Today

For the past 25 years, Jeffry Mitchell has approached his artistic exploration of the shared human experiences of love, death, sex, and spiritual trial and redemption with sincerity and intuitive intelligence. His newest body of work is now featured at Mark Moore Fine Art as an exclusive ARTSY online exhibition opening today.

Vire this presentation of five new works from his most recent series of Salt-Fired Ceramics at:

https://www.artsy.net/show/mark-moore-fine-art-jeffry-mitchell-the-salt-fired-works-2017

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JEFFRY MITCHELL‘s art radiates with a charming appeal, marked by an exuberant abundance of forms, materials, and techniques. From his earliest experiments with resin and paper to his extended engagement with ceramics and his latest multi-part installations, Mitchell has consistently investigated the decorative and the theatrical and blurred distinctions between art, craft, and functionality.

Mitchell has developed a distinctive visual language full of symbolic characters like alphabet primers, flowers, elephants, bears, and other flora and fauna. What might first appear as child-like sweetness or nostalgic sentimentality quickly gives way to complex emotional content and deeper narratives that touch upon his identity as a creative artist and gay man as well as his working class Catholic background. Mitchell also responds to specific aspects of the history of art, craft, and visual culture. He fashions sophisticated twists on sources as diverse as Chinese funerary sculpture, folk art, Russian Constructivism, watercolor nature illustrations, and modernist assemblage.

 

Mitchell’s work can be found in numerous private and public collections including the Museum of Fine Art Houston, the Tang Museum, the Crocker Art Museum, Seattle Art Museum, Philadelphia Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Philadelphia Art Museum, Fogg Art Museum (Harvard University), Honolulu Museum of Art, Tacoma Art Museum, and the Portland Art Museum.

ADDITIONAL WORKS AVAILABLE:

In addition, I have taken the liberty of placing all available work on the Mark Moore Fine Art ARTSY webpage for easy reference. You can find all the details and images of all the Mitchell works currently available at:

https://www.artsy.net/mark-moore-gallery/artist/jeffry-mitchell

Finally, you will find a superb essay on the work of Jeffry Mitchell currently featured in the ARTSY WRITER Section of the website. You can check out this wonderful look at the work of Jeffry Mitchell by art writer Jen Graves at the following link:

https://www.artsy.net/mark-moore-gallery/article/mark-moore-fine-art-work-artist-jeffry-mitchell

#markmoorefineart

#jeffrymitchell

 

Feodor Voronov Online Catalog Now Available for Download 

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Please find a link attached for you our most recent on-line catalog on the work of FEODOR VORONOV as part of our ongoing STATEMENTS Series of publications.

Please download it and enjoy it compliments of MMFA at:

http://www.markmoorefineart.com/attachment/en/581c5e0c84184e51358b4568/Press/581c5ea884184e51358b804a

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Mark Moore Fine Art is thrilled to announce “Rainbow of Chaos“, a presentation of recent work by artist, Feodor Voronov. This exclusive online ARTSY exhibition will be an exploration into Voronov’s manipulation of “operative formalism,” and engagement with language.

View this presentation of paintings and works on paper by Voronov now at: 

https://www.artsy.net/show/mark-moore-fine-art-feodor-voronov-rainbow-of-chaos

#markmoorefineart

#feodorvoronov

Previewed: Jeffry Mitchell: The Salt-Fired Works 2017 – June 26, 2017 – July 30, 2017

For the past 25 years, Jeffry Mitchell has approached his artistic exploration of the shared human experiences of love, death, sex, and spiritual trial and redemption with sincerity and intuitive intelligence. His newest body of work is now featured at Mark Moore Fine Art.

https://www.artsy.net/show/mark-moore-fine-art-jeffry-mitchell-the-salt-fired-works-2017

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JEFFRY MITCHELL‘s art radiates with a charming appeal, marked by an exuberant abundance of forms, materials, and techniques. From his earliest experiments with resin and paper to his extended engagement with ceramics and his latest multi-part installations, Mitchell has consistently investigated the decorative and the theatrical and blurred distinctions between art, craft, and functionality.

Mitchell has developed a distinctive visual language full of symbolic characters like alphabet primers, flowers, elephants, bears, and other flora and fauna. What might first appear as child-like sweetness or nostalgic sentimentality quickly gives way to complex emotional content and deeper narratives that touch upon his identity as a creative artist and gay man as well as his working class Catholic background. Mitchell also responds to specific aspects of the history of art, craft, and visual culture. He fashions sophisticated twists on sources as diverse as Chinese funerary sculpture, folk art, Russian Constructivism, watercolor nature illustrations, and modernist assemblage.

Jeffry Mitchell was born in 1958, the fourth of nine children of working-class parents. After experiencing a largely itinerant childhood owing to his father’s career, Mitchell continued this nomadic lifestyle in his young adulthood. Although his family eventually established a somewhat permanent residency in Seattle, he decided to attend the University of Dallas in Irving, Texas, and spent a semester in Rome, an experience that had a profound effect on his work. After graduating with a BA in painting, Mitchell moved to Japan to teach English and landed an apprenticeship with a production potter in Seto (known as one of the “Six Old Kilns” in traditional Japanese pottery). Impressed and changed by his experiences abroad, Mitchell returned to Seattle in 1984 and enrolled in a printmaking class at the Cornish College of the Arts. This spurred his decision to pursue an MFA in printmaking at the Tyler School of Art, Temple University in Philadelphia. During his studies he returned to Rome, setting up a studio in the basement classrooms at Villa Caproni. Notable solo exhibitions of Mitchell’s work include: Like a Valentine: The Art of Jeffry Mitchell, 2012-2013, Henry Art Gallery; Some Things and Their Shadows, 2009, Kittredge Gallery, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA; Shiny Happy Pretty (with Tina Hoggatt), 2008, Missoula Art Museum; Hanabuki, 2001, Henry Art Gallery; My Spirit, 1992, New Museum of Contemporary Art, NY; and Documents Northwest: The Poncho Series, 1990, Seattle Art Museum.

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Among contemporary artists from the Northwest, Jeffry Mitchell stands as a major figure in ceramics, sculpture and drawing. As stated in a recent review in WHITEHOT Magazine on his recent retrospective:

“Jeffry Mitchell’s work is compulsive: compulsively pretty, compulsively ribald, compulsively childlike, crude, prolific, and so on. In person, the artist is also compulsively sweet, childlike, and ribald. Everyone up here in the Northwest knows him. He’s one of our best.”

“Beyond the intricacies of influence informing Mitchell’s work, the thing that strikes you at this retrospective is how auteur-like the artist is. A real Renaissance man, Mitchell makes every medium his plaything, literally, and not without grace.”

“People like to describe his effortless touch as “casual.” Despite the fact that plenty of effort obviously goes into the production of each piece, the handmade ease is exemplary of a deliberate, regional brand of romanticism that champions Ruskinian anti-industrialism. Sure, it’s a cliché, but it’s a genuine sensibility that shies away from fussy finish and slickness and embraces the political potential of art forms that champion rather than shy away from the cheesy associations of craft. We’re not talking the glass factory gloss of Chihuly. Rather, Mitchell’s kind of craft speaks a language of touch (handmade) that’s emphatically personal and communal. His practice is a metaphoric laying on of hands, and essentially one of transubstantiation, turning raw material into something spiritual by pushing the psychological, human softness of craft to its limits. Lumpy, erotic pottery imprinted with his message (his massage) is merely the tip of the iceberg. Typographical alphabets written on vellum are watery and hand-lettered, like an illicit note. Installations illuminated by the dull blaze of naked lightbulbs shining through paper cut-outs look like lo-fi gobos casting whispered sweet-nothings at a wall. “HELLO HELLO” they say. Always, Mitchell extends an invitation to engage. (“HELLO HELLO” is iterated over and over in his pieces like a mantra. Like a valentine.) This is why everyone is ensorcelled by Jeffry Mitchell.”

– Art Critic Amanda Manitach

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Jeffry Mitchell’s work can be found in numerous private and public collections including the Museum of Fine Art Houston, the Tang Museum, the Crocker Art Museum, Seattle Art Museum, Philadelphia Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Philadelphia Art Museum, Fogg Art Museum (Harvard University), Honolulu Museum of Art, Tacoma Art Museum, and the Portland Art Museum.

ADDITIONAL WORKS AVAILABLE:

In addition, I have taken the liberty of placing all available work on the Mark Moore Fine Art ARTSY webpage for easy reference. You can find all the details and images of all the Mitchell works currently available at:

https://www.artsy.net/mark-moore-gallery/artist/jeffry-mitchell

Finally, you will find a superb essay on the work of Jeffry Mitchell currently featured in the ARTSY WRITER Section of the website. You can check out this wonderful look at the work of Jeffry Mitchell by art writer Jen Graves at the following link:

https://www.artsy.net/mark-moore-gallery/article/mark-moore-fine-art-work-artist-jeffry-mitchell

 

Feodor Voronov: “Rainbow of Chaos” On View Now

Mark Moore Fine Art is thrilled to announce “Rainbow of Chaos”, a presentation of recent work by artist, Feodor Voronov. This exclusive online ARTSY exhibition will be an exploration into Voronov’s manipulation of “operative formalism,” and engagement with language.

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View this presentation now on ARTSY at the following link:

https://www.artsy.net/show/mark-moore-fine-art-feodor-voronov-rainbow-of-chaos

For additional information, check out the MMFA website.

#markmoorefineart  #feodorvoronov

Yoram Wolberger “False Idols” Closes This Monday

Mark Moore Fine Art is very proud to present an exclusive online exhibition on ARTSY by artist YORAM WOLBERGER on view through June 19, 2017.

Your can view this exhibition now on our ARTSY website by clicking here.

https://www.artsy.net/show/mark-moore-fine-art-yoram-wolberger-false-idols

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Yoram Wolberger uses childhood toys and everyday domestic items to create his large scale sculptures, foregrounding the latent symbolism and cultural paradigms of these objects that so subtly inform Western culture. By enlarging this ephemera to life size, Wolberger emphasizes the distortions of their original manufacture disallowing any real illusion and conceptually forcing the viewer to reconsider their meanings. When enlarged beyond any possibility of dismissal, we see that toy soldiers create lines between Us and Them, plastic cowboys and Indians marginalize and stereotype the Other, even wedding cake bride and groom figurines dictate our expected gender roles.

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Wolberger (b. 1963, Tel Aviv, Israel) earned his MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute’s (CA) New Genres Department. He has had solo exhibitions in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco, and has been featured in group exhibitions at the Brooklyn Museum of Art (NY), deCordova Sculpture Park (MA), the Aldrich Contemporary Museum (CT), Orange County Museum of Art (CA), Museum of Contemporary Art (IL) and the Israeli Museum of Modern Art (Israel) among others. His works have been acquired for the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum of Art (NY), Frederick R. Weisman Foundation (CA), the Orange County Museum of Art (CA), Sweeney Art Gallery, University of California Riverside (CA) and the McNay Art Museum (TX). The artist lives and works in San Francisco, CA.

#markmoorefineart

#yoramwolberger

One Night Only: “Monument” at Gowanus E-waste Warehouse Brooklyn featuring Penelope Umbrico and Jean Shin

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In the context of the term “recycling” these artists engage with questions of up-cycling, down-cycling, value, commerce, consumption, materiality, and obsolescence. They ask what it means to “make” in a world filled with the aftermath and by-products of industrial consumer culture, where e-obsolescence insists on being visible and physically negotiated in the material world – a world in which optimistic Modernist ideologies of efficiency, productivity, mass-production, and newness result in dystopic technological breakdown and ecological disaster.

With the generosity and collaboration of the Gowanus E-Waste Warehouse, some of the installations are monumental and some are so small they’re barely detectable. In all cases, these objects received by the warehouse at the end of their life are re-cast, given new life and new meaning.

Organized by Yazmine Mihojevich and Penelope Umbrico, with special thanks to Christine Datz-Romero, Daniel Vargas, Troy Hanna and Anastasia Plavnicky, and all the volunteers at the Gowanus E-Waste Warehouse.

*Because the Gowanus E-Waste Warehouse is a working warehouse, this installation and event is ONE NIGHT ONLY

The Gowanus E-Waste Warehouse is located at 469 President Street, Brooklyn, NY 11215

Vendor support for this project includes:  Threes Brewing; Breuckelen Distilling; Brooklyn Brine … more vendors to be confirmed.